Key Findings from the KASB Teacher Contract Survey Report

Key Findings from the KASB Teacher Contract Survey Report

KASB recently released the 2016 KASB Teacher Contract Survey Annual Report.  This report includes the data reported by Kansas Public School Districts to the Kansas Association of School Boards related to Teacher Contracts from the 1995-96 school year through the 2015-16 school year.  
The KASB Teacher Contract Survey changed format beginning with the 2016-17 school year.  This report presents the data in the new format, and utilizes data formerly collected via the Teacher Contract Details and Negotiations Settlement Surveys.  In addition, many of the questions formerly asked on the Teacher Contract Details Survey have been moved to the Calendar, Supplemental Pay, Employee Relations, and Retirement Surveys.  Data is presented at the state level in this report, but is available by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, and High School League at kasbresearch.org.

Here are some key findings from the report:

  • Between 1995-96 and 2015-16:
    • The average teacher base salary increased 47%
      from $23,427 to $34,386, while the average fringe benefits increased 236% from
      $1,767 to $5,935. 
    • The average base salaries for teachers have
      increased at a higher rate for larger districts.
    • The increases in board-paid fringe benefits for
      districts of different sizes have been fairly consistent, with teachers at
      larger districts receiving more fringe benefits than those from smaller
      districts. 
    • The largest increase in the average package
      increases were seen between 2004-05 and 2005-06, and the largest decreases in
      the average package increases were seen between 2008-09 and 2009-10.
    • The average number of negotiation sessions went
      from between 5 and 6 to just under 4 sessions.
    • Negotiation session length has been consistently
      around 2 hours, with larger districts reporting longer sessions.
    • District negotiations costs have gone from just
      under $2,000 per district to just under $1,000 per district.
    • Total district time spent on negotiations for
      small and medium districts has remained between 50 and 100 hours.
    • Total district time spent on negotiations for
      large districts has gone from between 400 and 500 hours to between 100 and 200
      hours.
    • Districts reporting impasse decreased from 16%
      to 4%.
    • Districts reporting joint impasse decreased from
      9% to 3%. 
    • Districts reporting that unilateral contracts
      were issued remained below 2%.
    • The average contract length decreased from 1.2
      years to 1.0 years, indicating more districts moved from 2 year contracts to 1
      year contracts.
    • Average annual leave allocations by type have
      remained fairly consistent with the following average number of days per year:
      Sabbatical 179, Emergency 53, Family 67, All Purpose 10, Medical 10, Personal
      3, Bereavement 4, Maternity 26, Legal 3, Association 8, Professional 3, and
      Other 5.
    • Average daily substitute pay increased from
      $61.56 to $89.87.
    • Districts paying for unused leave increased from
      70% to 95%. 
    • Districts paying for unused leave at retirement
      increased from 50% to 75%.
    • Districts paying for unused leave at maximum
      accumulation increased from 30% to 60%.
    • Districts paying for unused leave at death or
      resignation remained around 30%.
    • The maximum accumulation of leave to be paid for
      small and medium districts remained between 40 and 60 days.
    • The maximum accumulation of leave to be paid for
      large districts increased from 80 to 110 days.
    • The daily reimbursement rate for unused leave
      increased from $30 to $57.
    • Large districts went from paying more than the
      state average and more than small and medium districts for unused pay to paying
      less than these groups.
    • Districts with a paid leave bank increased from
      50% to 84%.
    • Districts with voluntary paid leave banks
      increased from 35% to 70%.
    • Districts with teacher controlled paid leave
      banks increased from 40% to 60%, then decreased to 36% after districts started
      reporting joint committee-controlled paid leave banks.
    • The maximum number of days allowed in paid leave
      banks increased from 150 to 200. 
    • Teacher contributions into paid leave banks
      remained around 2.5 days per teacher.
    • Board contributions into paid leave banks
      decreased from 71 days to 41 days.
    • Individual teacher max usage of paid leave banks
      remained around 35 days.
  • Between 1996-97 and 2015-16:
    • Districts with negotiation settlements tied to
      enrollment decreased from 15.1% to 2.2%.
    • Districts with binding arbitration of grievances
      in their agreements increased from 7.2% to 9.4%.
    • Districts with tuition reimbursement plans decreased
      from 18.8% to 22.5%.
    • Districts with limits on salary schedule
      placements for new hires decreased from 22.7% to 14.6%.
    • Districts including disciplinary procedures in
      their negotiated agreements increased from 19.4% to 25.5%.
    • Districts including due process language in
      their agreements increased from 29.6% to 31.1%.
    • Districts including site based management
      language in their agreements increased from 2.3% to 4.1%.
    • Districts requiring positive evaluations for
      step movement increased from none to 4.1%
    • Districts reporting that their Board had no
      flexibility to change the use of contract days increased from 15.5% to 19.9%.
  • Between 1997-98 and 2015-16:
    • Teachers on average used between 6 and 7 days
      per year.
    • Teachers in larger districts were likely to use
      more days than those from smaller districts.
  • Between 1999-00 and 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened
      for salary schedule or fringe benefits changes decreased from 6% to 2%.
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened
      for contract day changes decreased from 7% to 1%.
    • Districts reporting agreements could be reopened
      for unspecified items decreased from 6% to 3%.
    • Districts reporting salary schedules could be
      reopened for enrollment changes decreased from 6% to 1%.
    • Districts reporting salary schedules could be
      reopened for legislative changes decreased from 6% to 3%.
  • Between 2001-02 and 2015-16:
    • Districts including FMLA provisions in their
      agreements decreased from 62.5% to 47.2%.
    • Larger districts were more likely to include
      FMLA provisions in their agreements.
  • Between 2007-08 and 2015-16:
    • Districts reporting joint committee controlled
      paid leave banks increased from 50% to 55%.
  • Between 2010-11 and 2015-16:
    • An average of between 6% and 10% of responding
      districts indicated they offered an “incentive” or “retention” bonus.
    • The minimum bonus amounts have remained fairly
      consistent between $750 and $1,000. 
    • The maximum amounts started just above $2,000 in
      2010-11 decreasing to under $1,500 in 2012-13 and remaining there.
In addition to the report, KASB released The following data resources, which allow users to drill down and filter by district, KASB Region, KSHSAA Class, KNEA Uniserv, High School League, and other factors:

The report as well as the tools mentioned can be found at kasbresearch.org.  Questions on the report and data can be sent to research@kasb.org.