Education bills introduced Feb. 7

Five bills concerning school districts were introduced Feb. 7. KASB staff is continuing to analyze other bills for their impact on education.  SB 395 - Setting a maximum final average salary amount for purposes of computing retirement benefits for certain members of KPERS, KP&F and the retirement system for judges. The bill would place limits on retirement benefits by setting a maximum final average salary for some retirees, regardless of actual salary. Referred to Senate Financial Institutions and Insurance.  HB 2653 - Income tax; relating to credits; educational expenses made by certain school employees. The bill would provide a 20% tax...

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Numerous education-related bills introduced as deadline approaches

As the deadline for introduction of bills (except by exempt committees) approaches Friday, here are some new bills from the past several days. One bill has a hearing scheduled Thursday. No other bills have been scheduled for hearings as of Tuesday evening, but that could change as committee schedules are posted.  Dyslexia. HB 2602 - Requiring screenings for dyslexia and related disorders in public schools. By July 1, 2019, the state board of education must develop rules and regulations for the appropriate screening of students for dyslexia and related disorders. Local school districts must begin screening by the 2019-20 school...

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KASB Live at 12:30 p.m. today to talk about Week 2 of legislative session

Education was front-and-center during the second week of the legislative session and KASB will conduct a live update at 12:30 p.m. today to review those developments.  To join the KASB Live discussion go to this link.  During the week, Kansas Education Commissioner Randy Watson briefed legislative committees and there was more discussion of Gov. Sam Brownback’s budget, including his K-12 funding increase, and the possible fiscal impact of those proposals.  Legislators also discussed KPERS issues and the need to increase mental health and childcare services.  KASB Live will also provide a look at what is expected in the coming week.   

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Committee hears KPERS options in light of tight budget

The House Appropriations Committee received information on extending the target date to pay off the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System's $9 billion unfunded liability on Tuesday morning.  Just like refinancing a mortgage or credit card debt to pay over a longer period, the option would save money in the short term but cost the state much more in the long term.  Extending the KPERS payment period is being discussed as a way to get through a tight budget picture in the next several years, especially if the Legislature adds more state aid for K-12 education to comply with the Kansas Supreme...

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